1. Coronavirus explainer: Potential effects of COVID on liver health; know the key indicators  Times of India
  2. Scientists evaluate JNK inhibitors in treating moderate to severe COVID-19 patients  News-Medical.Net
  3. COVID-19 outcomes improved for SARDs patients through Omicron wave  News-Medical.Net
  4. How specific comorbidities impact severity of COVID-19  News-Medical.Net
  5. Implications of impaired type I interferon immunity and increasing COVID-19 severity  News-Medical.Net
  6. View Full coverage on Google News
Coronavirus attack leads to an extensive range of effects on the human body. This is because of the affinity of the virus for angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), which is expressed on different human cells. Few months after the novel virus attack was declared pandemic, researchers and health experts began to see the effects of the virus on different body organs; until then it was assumed that the viral attack is limited to the respiratory tract only.Coronavirus attack leads to an extensive range of effects on the human body. This is because of the affinity of the virus for angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), which is expressed on different human cells. Few months after the novel virus attack was declared pandemic, researchers and health experts began to see the effects of the virus on different body organs; until then it was assumed that the viral attack is limited to the respiratory tract only.

Coronavirus explainer: Potential effects of COVID on liver health; know the key indicators | The Times of India

Researchers compared COVID-19 severity outcomes among individuals infected with the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron and Delta variants.Researchers compared COVID-19 severity outcomes among individuals infected with the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron and Delta variants.

Study shows that Omicron infections were associated with a substantially reduced risk of progression to severe clinical outcomes relative to Delta infections

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The concept of standard of care (SoC) treatment is commonly utilized in clinical trials. However, in a setting of an emergent disease, such as COVID-19, where there is no established effective treatment, it is unclear what the investigators considered as the SoC in early clinical trials. The aim of this study was to analyze and classify SoC reported in randomized controlled trial (RCT) registrations and RCTs published in scholarly journals and on preprint servers about treatment interventions for COVID-19. We conducted a cross-sectional study. We included RCTs registered in a trial registry, and/or published in a scholarly journal, and/or published on preprint servers medRxiv and bioRxiv (any phase; any recruitment status; any language) that aim to compare treatment interventions related to COVID-19 and SoC, available from January 1, 2020, to October 8, 2020. Studies using „standard“ treatment were eligible for inclusion if they reported they used standard, usual, conventional, or routine treatment. When we found such multiple reports of an RCT, we treated those multiple sources as one unit of analysis. Among 737 unique trials included in the analysis, 152 (21%) reported that SoC was proposed by the institutional or national authority. There were 129 (18%) trials that reported component(s) of SoC; the remaining trials simply reported that they used SoC, with no further detail. Among those 129 trials, the number of components of SoC ranged from 1 to 10. The most commonly used groups of interventions in the SoC were antiparasitics (62% of the trials), antivirals (57%), antibiotics (31%), oxygen (17%), antithrombotics/anticoagulants (14%), vitamins (13%), immunomodulatory agents (13%), corticosteroids (12%), analgesics/antipyretics (12%). Various combinations of those interventions were used in the SoC, with up to 7 different types of interventions combined. Posology, timing, and method of administration were frequently not reported for SoC components. Most RCTs (82%) about treatment for COVID-19 that were registered or published in the first 9 months of the pandemic did not describe the “standard of care” they used. Many of those interventions have, by now, been shown as ineffective or even detrimental.Background The concept of standard of care (SoC) treatment is commonly utilized in clinical trials. However, in a setting of an emergent disease, such as COVID-19, where there is no established effective treatment, it is unclear what the investigators considered as the SoC in early clinical trials. The aim of this study was to analyze and classify SoC reported in randomized controlled trial (RCT) registrations and RCTs published in scholarly journals and on preprint servers about treatment interventions for COVID-19. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study. We included RCTs registered in a trial registry, and/or published in a scholarly journal, and/or published on preprint servers medRxiv and bioRxiv (any phase; any recruitment status; any language) that aim to compare treatment interventions related to COVID-19 and SoC, available from January 1, 2020, to October 8, 2020. Studies using „standard“ treatment were eligible for inclusion if they reported they used standard, usual, conventional, or routine treatment. When we found such multiple reports of an RCT, we treated those multiple sources as one unit of analysis. Results Among 737 unique trials included in the analysis, 152 (21%) reported that SoC was proposed by the institutional or national authority. There were 129 (18%) trials that reported component(s) of SoC; the remaining trials simply reported that they used SoC, with no further detail. Among those 129 trials, the number of components of SoC ranged from 1 to 10. The most commonly used groups of interventions in the SoC were antiparasitics (62% of the trials), antivirals (57%), antibiotics (31%), oxygen (17%), antithrombotics/anticoagulants (14%), vitamins (13%), immunomodulatory agents (13%), corticosteroids (12%), analgesics/antipyretics (12%). Various combinations of those interventions were used in the SoC, with up to 7 different types of interventions combined. Posology, timing, and method of administration were frequently not reported for SoC components. Conclusion Most RCTs (82%) about treatment for COVID-19 that were registered or published in the first 9 months of the pandemic did not describe the “standard of care” they used. Many of those interventions have, by now, been shown as ineffective or even detrimental.

Standard of care for COVID-19 in randomized clinical trials registered in trial registries and published in preprint servers and scholarly journals: a cross-sectional study | BMC Medical Research Methodology | Full Text

Despite the introduction of vaccines, COVID-19 still affects millions of people worldwide. A better understanding of pathophysiology and the discovery of novel therapies are needed. One of the cells of interest in COVID-19 is the neutrophil. This cell type is being recruited to a site of inflammation as one of the first immune cells. In this project, we investigated a variety of neutrophils phenotypes during COVID-19 by measuring the expression of markers for migration, maturity, activation, gelatinase granules and secondary granules using flow cytometry. We show that neutrophils during COVID-19 exhibit altered phenotypes compared to healthy individuals. The activation level including NETs production and maturity of neutrophils seem to last longer during COVID-19 than expected for innate immunity. Neutrophils as one of the drivers of severe cases of COVID-19 are considered as potential treatment targets. However, for a successful implementation of treatment, there is a need for a better understanding of neutrophil functions and phenotypes in COVID-19. Our study answers some of those questions.Scientific Reports - A prolonged innate systemic immune response in COVID-19

A prolonged innate systemic immune response in COVID-19 | Scientific Reports

Researchers compared the relationship between COVID-19 infection and periodontitis severity between subjects with mild versus moderate periodontitis in a study.For a study, researchers sought to compare the relationship between COVID-19 infection and periodontitis severity in subjects with mild periodontitis versus...

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Data from U.S. and European COVID-19 registries of patients with rheumatic diseases have yielded actionable information to help rheumatologists manage patients with the virus, according to data presented at EULAR 2022 Congress.Data from U.S. and European COVID-19 registries of patients with rheumatic diseases have yielded actionable information to help rheumatologists manage patients with the virus, according to data presented at EULAR 2022 Congress.

COVID-19 global registry data key in rheumatic disease management

High dose vs low dose corticosteroids were equally efficacious in reducing the mortality rate among patients with COVID-19.Is the mortality rate in patients with COVID-19 affected by use of high vs low dose corticosteroids — and how does dosage level affect ICU admission and intubation rates?

Effect of High vs Low Dose Corticosteroids on COVID-19 Mortality, Outcomes - Pulmonology Advisor

Researchers determined LL-37 appears to be elevated during SARS-CoV-2 infection and may contribute to hypercoagulation.Researchers sought to determine the role of LL-37 in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection and whether it contributes to hypercoagulation.

Antimicrobial Peptide LL‑37 Contributes to Thrombotic Complications in Patients With COVID‑19 - Hematology Advisor

Within the context of a cross-sectional study, a research team led by Lukas Hartl, Thomas Reiberger and Michael Trauner from the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology within the Department of...Within the context of a cross-sectional study, a research team led

COVID-19: Chronic liver disease patients at high risk of liver failure and bile duct damage

Within the context of a cross-sectional study, a research team led by Lukas Hartl, Thomas Reiberger and Michael Trauner from the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology within the Department of...Within the context of a cross-sectional study, a research team led by Lukas Hartl, Thomas Reiberger and Michael Trauner from the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology within the Department of...

COVID-19: Chronic liver disease patients at high risk of liver failure and bile duct damage

By May 2021, more than 151 million people were confirmed to have been infected with SARS-CoV-2, and more than 3.1 million deaths attributable to COVID-19 Results of a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the incidence and outcomes of COVID-19 in individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD).By May 2021, more than 151 million people were confirmed to have been infected with SARS-CoV-2, and more than 3.1 million deaths attributable to COVID-19 had been reported worldwide. Early in the pandemic, evidence suggested a higher incidence of severe COVID-19 in patients with chronic diseases, including chronic kidney disease (CKD), and an association with…

COVID-19 Outcomes in People with Chronic Kidney Disease - Docwire News

About one in five patients with preexisting chronic liver disease develop progressive cholestasis after severe COVID-19About one in five patients with preexisting chronic liver disease develop progressive cholestasis after severe COVID-19

COVID-19 Tied to Progression of Chronic Liver Disease - Consumer Health News | HealthDay

Patients with chronic liver disease may suffer hepatic complications as a result of severe COVID-19. A study conducted by a research team led by Lukas Hartl, Thomas Reiberger and Michael Trauner from ...

Chronic liver disease patients experience hepatic complications as a result of severe COVID-19

Inflammatory response in COVID-19 is responsible for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multiorgan failure and plays a major role in morbidity and mortality of patients. The present study...Inflammatory response in COVID-19 is responsible for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multiorgan failure and plays a major role in morbidity and mortality of patients. The present...

Circulatory Cytokine Levels Predicts Disease Severity in COVID-19

Inflammatory response in COVID-19 is responsible for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multiorgan failure and plays a major role in morbidity and mortality of patients. The present study...Inflammatory response in COVID-19 is responsible for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multiorgan failure and plays a major role in morbidity and mortality of patients. The present study...

Circulatory Cytokine Levels Predicts Disease Severity in COVID-19

TUESDAY, June 21, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- About one in five patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) develop progressive cholestasis after severe COVID-19, according to a study published online MayTUESDAY, June 21, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- About one in five patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) develop progressive cholestasis after severe COVID-19, according to a study published online May

COVID-19 Tied to Progression of Chronic Liver Disease | Health, Medicine and Fitness | siouxcityjournal.com